Partner-Interview


/methods/partner-interview/partner-interview.png

Foto von Lee Jordan (abgerufen am 30.09.2009)

Kurzbeschreibung

Die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer bilden Paare und befragen sich gegenseitig. Mit den gesammelten Informationen kann ein Partner den anderen in der Gruppe vorstellen und bekannt machen.

Ablauf

  • Paare bilden und darauf achten, dass sich die Paare nicht schon kennen.
  • Befragung und Informationsaustausch in max. fünf Minuten (eventuell Notizen machen).
  • Ein Kreis (stehend oder sitzend) wird gebildet.
  • Die Vorstellungsrunde beginnt, wobei der Interview-Partner Aussagen zur jeweils anderen Person macht.

Benötigte Tools und Materialien

Offline:

  • Papier für Notizen
  • Kugelschreiber

Kommentare

Es müssen nicht alle Aussagen des Interviews wiederholt werden. Mitunter zeigen sich dem Vorgestellten ganz neue Aspekte durch die Interpretation und Auswahl des Partner.

Parliamentary discussion


Picture for Parliamentary discussion

Picture from workshop at the methopedia project

Short description

Suitable as a goal-oriented task for large groups (at least 30 people). Requires clear definition of the goals by workshop organizers in advance. Minimum time required is 3 hours.

Process description

  1. Preparation
    • The workshop leaders first define the purpose
    • Participants are divided into same size groups according to earlier defined criteria (e.g. according to age, education, or regional affiliation)
    • Rules of the game are defined and distributed by the workshop leaders
  2. Implementation
    • A topic is given to the (parliamentary) groups, so they can define their position
    • According to a set timetable, the faction leaders meet to determine an overall notion
    • A plenary discussion with equally allocated speaker times follows
    • To close, a democratic vote takes place, so the overall result can be logged
  3. Completion
    • The workshop organizers produce the final report in a timely fashion

Required resources

  • Game rules
  • paper
  • flip chart
  • presentation equipment

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/parliamentary-debate

Podiumsdiskussion


Bild zur Methode Podiumsdiskussion

Foto von bensonkua (abgerufen am 15.10.2009)

Kurzbeschreibung

Die Teilnehmer diskutieren eine Problematik von hoher Relevanz.

Ablauf

  1. Ein Teilnehmer leitet die Diskussion.
    • Nennung des Themas
    • Geplante Zeit
    • Vorstellung der Teilnehmer im Podium
    • Erste Frage …
  2. Die Teilnehmer im Podium diskutieren das Thema.
  3. Nach einer gesetzten Frist bittet der Diskussionsleiter um eine letzte Aussage oder eine Zusammenfassung.
  4. Nach der Podiumsdiskussion können die anderen Anwesenden (das Auditorium) in die Diskussion einbezogen werden.

Benötigte Tools und Materialien

Der Diskussionsleiter verschafft sich Informationen zum Thema und bereitet einen Fragenkatalog vor.

Kommentare

Es sollten nicht mehr als sechs Personen an der Diskussion teilnehmen.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/panel-discussion

Open space


Picture for Open space

Image by Pandiyan (Access: 30.09.2009)

Short description

Open Space is a method for large groups where 20 to 1000 people collaborate to work on a topic or find a solution for a problem.

Process description

  1. At the beginning all participants are sitting in a circle. The facilitator “opens the space” and introduces the procedure.
  2. Content and organisation emerge from the interests and topics of the participants. Everybody can make a contribution. It should be a topic or task with some urgency. Someone should be willing to take the responsibility.
  3. Issues are assigned to the available work rooms and time slots on a large paper-covered wall.
  4. During the market phase, starting times and rooms are negotiated and participants sign up to rooms according to their interest in the topics.
  5. Group work: Participants self-organise their work, guided by the law of two feet (see below). The group organisers are asked to document the results of the group work in order to make it available to other participants.
  6. Morning and evening news
  7. Evaluation and implementation planning
  8. Final round (often with a ritual where the speaker holds up a rod)
  9. „Closing the room“

Required resources

Space for documentation

Comments

The success of an open space conference depends on the implementation of the ideas that were generated. Often the participants are highly motivated such that a powerful momentum is generated and numerous activities initiated. However, the implementation should be supported and supervised. The facilitators are responsible for that. They need to circulate and determine which project needs which form of support.

The law of two feet: If at any time during our time together you find yourself in any situation where you are neither learning nor contributing, use your two feet. Go to some other place where you may learn and contribute.

Reflection

  1. Do we have one headline at the beginning or what is the reason to come together?
  2. Are the processes limited in time or participants?
  3. Is the duration limited: possible over serveral days, weeks, month?
  4. Should one use templates for the results and their documentation?

(Margit Scholl)

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/openspace

One-sentence summary


Picture for One-sentence summary

Image by NLanja (Access: 11.04.2011)

Short description

One-sentence sumaries are framed activities that can clearly indicate to teachers the level of there students' understandings. They prompt students to actively angage with the text in order to complete the brief exercise.

Process description

  1. Students summarize knowledge of a topic by constructing a single sentence that answers the questions "Who does what to whom, when, where, how, and why?"
  2. The purpose is to require students to select only the defining features of an idea.
  3. Evaluate the quality of each summary quickly and holistically.
  4. Note whether students have identified the essential concepts of the class topic and their interrelationships.
  5. Share your observations with your students.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/one-sentence-summary

Mnemonics


Picture for Mnemonics

Photo by moose.boy (retrieved on 07.11.2009)

Short description

Using mnemonics, people develop devices (mnemonic tricks), such as rhymes, formulas, sketches, or special words or sentences. The principle of mnemonics is to associate hard to memorise information with simpler representation.

Process description

We choose a specific topic, which has particularly difficult to remember content. We choose an appropriate mnemonic device (system/method). The terms to be remembered are expressed in simpler terms, according to the selected mnemonic device. They are repeated until all terms are properly learned by heart.

Required resources

Nothing special

Examples

Memorising with the help of a walk:

  1. Write the information to be learned on a notepad.
  2. Imagine walking (a specific route) and stopping at certain locations (for example, on a street, at a bus stop, by a lake, by a distinctive tree) and by each memorise one of the items from the notepad.
  3. Note in the notepad which content is associated with which place.
  4. Keep repeating the walk on that route until you have mastered the subject.

During an examination, you just need to imagine going on that walk to recall with relative ease what was learned.

See also:

Comments

Mnemonics doesn't only help memorising complicated processes faster and remembering them longer. The fact that you need to limit yourself to certain keywords, when using this learning technique, and that these keywords must be itemised in a specific format helps to structure the entire topic. Those who must constrain themselves exclusively to the important keywords in order to learn successfully will certainly let the "useless knowledge" go. Thus, although the mnemonics technique is primarily intended as a memorising and learning aid, it can also lead to pushing the extraneous, secondary information to the background and free the mind for the essential knowledge.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/mnemonics

Mini-case studies


Picture for Mini-case studies

Image by Let Ideas Compete (Access: 12.11.2009)

Short description

Case studies provide relevant, meaningful experiences in which learners can discover and abstract useful concepts and principles. In mini-case studies you can provide realistic, real-world experience by presenting a series of concise but complete examples.

Process description

  1. Start with a statement of the situation.
  2. Introduce any characters, objects, or organization of importance.
  3. Spell out crucial relationship among them.
  4. Alternate questions and answers about the situation.
  5. Questions should require the learner to carefully examine the situation, infer facts not stated, apply principles, and deduce conclusions.
  6. Pose some additional questions to learners.
  7. Learners should post their answers in the discussion forum.

Required resources

access to a discussion forum

Comments

Learners can also make up their own mini-case studies and submit them to a discussion forum so that other learners could comment on the ideas.

Activity description was prepared on the basis of W. Horton's "E-learning by design".

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/mini-case

Mindmapping


Picture for Mindmapping

Image by Kaeru (Access: 30.09.2009)

Short description

Mind-Mapping is a way of visualizing relationships. A concept forms the centre of a mindmap. Subconcepts are represented as branches which can have subbranches in return.

Process description

  1. Start with writing your central concept in the middle of an empty sheet of paper.
  2. Think of different aspects of the topic and construct the mind map.
  3. In order to organise your concepts, create higher level concepts to order the different aspects.
  4. Revise and annotate your mindmap so that you will be able to understand it later.

Required resources

  • Flipchart
  • Big sheet of paper
  • Coloured pens or mind mapping software

Comments

The basic idea is in the centre and can be quickly understood. The graphic representation supports the brainstorming and thinking process. A short glance at the mind map suffices to grasp the most important points.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/mindmapping

Letter to myself


Picture for Letter to myself

`Image by Pingu1963 (Access: 28.09.2009) [1]

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Short description

At the end of a course, participants write a letter to themselves which the the facilitator sends out after a certain interval to remind the participants of their ideas and intentions.

Process description

  1. The facilitator hands out paper, envelopes and pens to all participants.
  2. She explains the process.
  3. The participants now write a letter to themselves where they summarize what they have learned, what they want to implement and how.
  4. Participants put postage on the envelope and write their address on it.
  5. The facilitator collects the letters and sends them to the participants after a certain interval, e.g. four weeks.

Required resources

  • Paper for each participant
  • Envelopes for each participant
  • Stamps
  • Pens

Examples

Sample questions:

  • Thoughts about my goals and aspirations
  • What I want to accomplish this year
  • How can I reach these goals?

Comments

This letter is meant for a final reflection of the event. Participants can take stock of the course. It also serves as a reminder when the memory of the event and its activities and suggestions has faded or been forgotten.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/letter-to-myself

[1] not accessabel anymore, checked at 16.04.2017

Lecture


Picture for Lecture

Image by mikebaird (Access: 27.10.2012)

Short description

Lectures can be both face-to-face lecturers in the classroom as well as realtime or recorded video- and audiolectures. Lectures are usually justified by the need to teach specific facts and basic skills or having other specific learning targets. Lecture requires well-developed content. One of the advantages of choosing lecture as a teaching method is certainly the possibility to share lecturer"s personal experience and inspire the students for further activities and explorations. In the same time the lecture - especially in the case of large classrooms - is a one-way communication with few possibilities for active participation from the students.

PSI: https://psi.methopedia.eu/learning-activity/lecture